Cuchi-Cuchi

DTWS started back UP Monday night.

Yeah, I know, that was four whole days ago.

They actually have people on the show this time around who can dance.

Really, Simone, Nancy, a couple of the guys, they’re pretty good.

But today, I’d like to focus on Charo, the original Cuchi-Cuchi girl.

She’s paired with Keo Motsepe. Charo is a comedienne, singer, dancer, flamenco musician of Spanish descent.  As in Spain, Spanish.

In reality, she’s a very talented musician and isn’t above poking a little fun at her self.

I remember watching her on Carol Burnett’s show in the 1970s and it was funny.

Carol played Charo’s mom…funny stuff.

She’s pretty good for an old gal!

Regarding Charo’s date of birth, well, there is some question about her age.

As in it’s all over the map.

She asserted in a 1977 court hearing that her true year of birth was 1951.  That means A. she’s got me by a year, and B. she was 15 when she married Xavier Cugat, who BTW, was 66 at the time.

The year of her birth on official documents in Murcia, Spain and her original Spanish passport and her naturalization papers state her birth date as March 13, 1941, which makes her 75.

I’m guessin’ that’s closer to the truth.

She said in an interview that her parents allowed her to “falsify her age” to appear older when marrying Cugat.

Some reported it as 1945, 1946. And in 1964, she was referred to as Cugat’s “18 year old protégée,” which puts it at 1946.

Forty years ago, in 1977, when she divorced Cuggie, the judge in Vegas upheld her 1951 birth year as official.

She swore it was the truth, but said, “If people believe I’m older, that’s fine.”

Well, that’s a good thing, ‘cause we do.

en pointe

Louis loved the ladies of the ballet; he never missed a performance during the season.

And the ladies of the ballet, well they love Louis too.

A fat little man with a wisp of hair, he was nothing to look at.

Ah, but he was rich, and all the ladies en pointe knew that was the point.

Louis was generous, expecting nothing in return but companionship and some flirting.

For he was also wise, and knew his limits.

Each week, the lovely and talented Ivy Walker hosts a link-up challenging writers to spin a tale in six sentences – no more, no less. Click on the link right here to find out more and link your own post. While you’re there, click on the blue frog button to find more stories from some wonderful storytellers.

This week’s prompt was point.

Hollywood Connection…

So, there’s this little movie out there called Hunter Gatherer.

photo credit: Josh Locy

It’s an indie film, the kind I like.

I’ll admit, it’s not for everyone, and the story line isn’t the happiest all the time.  But there’s redemption in there somewhere.

Beautifully filmed in a Bonnie and Clyde gritty kinda way, the film tells the struggle of an ex-con’s reentry into society.

He looks for his last love; she’s not looking for him.

He looks for his friends; they’re not looking for him.

He looks for a future; and finds one that’s an unsure surprise.

The film was featured and was a winner at the 2016 South by Southwest film festival.

Roger Ebert said this, “…Written and directed by Joshua Locy, “Hunter Gatherer” doesn’t look or feel like many movies being made right now. It’s about African-Americans living modestly in a black neighborhood in our second largest city, and the sense of inequity and systemic discrimination is implicit in the story, but it’s a quiet, gentle film, laid back without seeming sluggish. It never veers into a brutal crime plot to juice things up (as many similarly-set movies tend to do), nor does it feel compelled to make a statement about anything other than its eccentric characters’ relationships to each other and the wider world.”

So, why this film? And Who’s Josh Locy?

Josh Locy is the son of a childhood friend, Linda McKemy Locy of Virginia and Ohio.  His mom and I were sweethearts while on the cradle roll at Kerrs Creek Baptist Church back in the day.

She was six, I was five.  Really, there’s no there, there.

Our families have remained close over the years and their family is one of those five or so families that form a core friend base.

photo credit: IMDB.com

So, I had to see it.

The problem was, it isn’t in too many theaters.  It’s a small film.  But luckily I was able to watch it on demand, and luckily, I had an in to the writer director, Josh, and he was kind enough to answer a few questions.

So here goes…
RLR:  Why films?

JL:  All my friends growing up were in bands. I wanted so badly to be in a band but they were way more talented musically than I was. In our eyes they were super successful. So I regulated myself to being a superfan. But they opened the door up to creative endeavors.

RLR:  Directing/writing v. acting?

JL:  I know I have a couple acting credits on my imdb but I’m truly not an actor. Just a couple of projects I did to help out friends.  But writing and directing is the ultimate act of collaborative creation! I love having my vision expanded by the technicians, creatives, and actors who embody the script I wrote! It’s a truly magical experience and I can’t wait to do it again!

RLR:  What are your Inspiration points?

JL:  I am inspired by the realism and naturalism of great films from the 70’s like Panic in Needle Park, Straight Time, and Midnight Cowboy. I am also inspired by the magical realism of filmmakers like Apitchatpong Weerasethekul and novelists like Gabriel Garcia Marquez. HG starts off strictly based in reality, but those boundaries are slowly erased.

RLR:  Where did Hunter Gatherer come from?

JL:  HG was inspired by stories I heard from a friend named Eddie who was a heroin addicted pimp in 1980’s Philadelphia. When I first started writing the script, it was terrible because I had no real connection to the drugs and illicit activities, so I made a conceptual move to remove all of that stuff from the script and find what it is that truly connected me to this world and these characters. Upon doing that I realized that I was connected to the similarities between my own experiences in searching for true human connection with the experience of these characters who were so different from me.

RLR:  Which brings me to this question, How does a pasty white boy from Lynchburg, Virginia come UP with a story like HG?

JL:  haha — well — I think it comes from an intention to focus on the humanity of the characters. I was raised in a relatively homogenous community so knew that I needed to be intimately involved in an artistic endeavor with people who were different than me. I needed to be challenged and I needed my worldview expanded to understand myself and the world better. More than any assumed knowledge I have of the world I am portraying, ultimately the story is a product of constant, unquenchable curiosity about that world and a desire to connect with it at a deeper level.

RLR:  How difficult is it to get buy in and support for a film like this?

JL:  It’s impossible! Everything in the film industry is impossible until it’s not.  There are only so many investors at our budget level and we talked with all of them!  Finally – a company called cinetic connected us with two of their investor connections who were looking for exactly this kind of project. There was a lot of serendipity involved as well but my producers Sara Murphy and April Lamb kept pushing and pushing until we found the right people!

RLR:  How does your upbringing impact your motivation and style in art?

JL:  I was raised super religious in the south. I think there was a certain amount of humility and naiveté imbued in me from a young age. This fuels my curiosity and keeps me nice to people!

RLR:  What is the best thing anyone has said about the film?

JL:  An older gentleman at AFI Fest who had grown up in the neighborhood where we shot said that he had never seen his neighborhood represented so well on film. He told me that it is depicted just as it is. This meant a lot to me considering my answer to the next question.

RLR:  The worst?

JL:  People who suggest that I am not allowed to tell a story that features people who are different than I am have said the meanest things to me. It was to be expected and I understand that there are lot of questions to answer and conversations to be had in this regard.

RLR:  How did you snag Andre Royo?  (Great choice BTW.)

JL:  I’ve been a big fan of André’s since the wire and the spectacular now, but I avoided him because I didn’t want HG to feel like a stepson to the wire. But our mutual friend, the casting director Julia Kim, sent him the script anyway. He connected with the material on a deep, emotional level like no one else had. We met and discussed our goals and fears and agreed that we should give this thing a go.

RLR:  What’s next?

JL:  I’m working on a project with my friend about cheating and intrigue in the early days of professional bass fishing. A comedic noir in the vein of Fargo with nutso characters, high stakes, and murders!

So…it’s one of those films that stick with you, you have to pay attention to, and leaves you wanting to know more.

Check it out.

It’s not in theaters much, so you’ll have to down load or on demand it.  And you should.

Disaster Day!

March 21st in history is a day of disaster!

In 1788, a fire in New Orleans left most of the city in ruins!

In 1913, the Great Dayton Flood occurred killing over 360 people and destroying 20,000 homes in the area.

In Ponce, Puerto Rico on this date in 1937, nineteen people were gunned down by the police acting on the orders of the Governor!  Nice guy!

1980 saw President Jimmy Carter announcing that the US would boycott the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow due to the USSR’s invasion of Afghanistan.

And most horrific of all, in 2006 Twitter was created!

We can all thank this guy for that…

Yep!  Day of disaster